8 Tasty Sources of Fiber

By

Judith Hurley, RD

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Dietary fiber does a lot of good things. It helps you feel full, keeps you regular, and may help prevent heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Sure, bran cereal is loaded with it, but you might be surprised to see what other foods can help provide your daily dose. 

  • 1.

    Navy Beans

    Beans are exceptionally rich in fiber, and navy beans, with 19 grams of fiber per cup, top the list of healthy legumes. Men need 38 grams of fiber a day. A bowl of hearty navy bean soup will go a long way toward getting you there.

    bowl of white navy beans on table
  • 2.

    Raspberries

    Start your morning with a cup of sweet, flavorful raspberries. They're small in size but big in fiber; one cup provides 8 grams. Women should aim for 25 grams of fiber a day.

    raspberries
  • 3.

    Artichokes

    The average daily fiber intake of adults in the U.S. is only 15 grams, far short of the recommended amount. To get more, look to the artichoke. One medium artichoke or three-quarters cup of artichoke hearts provides 10 grams of fiber.

    close up of sliced artichoke half with knife on table
  • 4.

    Pears

    Pears, along with apples, dates, oranges, and some other fruits, are high in soluble fiber. This type of fiber helps lower cholesterol by preventing its absorption by the digestive tract. A medium pear has about 5 grams of fiber. Remember, enjoy pears and apples unpeeled because the skin and underlying pectin are a major fiber source.

    group of pears
  • 5.

    Almonds

    Among tree nuts, almonds are the richest in fiber, making them a good snack choice. A one-ounce portion (about 24 nuts) contains a respectable 3.5 grams of fiber.

    close up of almonds
  • 6.

    Sweet Potatoes

    Flavorful sweet potatoes are worth eating all year round, not just at Thanksgiving. A baked sweet potato boasts nearly 5 grams of fiber.

    Sweet potato
  • 7.

    Oats

    Oatmeal and oat bran contain a soluble fiber called beta-glucan, which has been shown to lower cholesterol and risk for heart disease. A bowlful of oatmeal—one cup—nets you 4 grams of fiber.

    bowl of oatmeal with blueberries
  • 8.

    Whole Wheat Pasta

    Its hearty flavor and firm "bite" aren't for everyone, but with more than 6 grams of fiber in a one-cup serving, whole wheat pasta is a great way to boost your fiber intake. And compared to white pasta's mere 2.5 grams per cup, it's really no contest.

    bowl of whole wheat pasta
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Medical Reviewers: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS Last Review Date: May 13, 2017

© 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

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Medical References

  1. Easy Gardening Artichoke. Agrilife Extension, Texas Agrilife Extension Service, Texas A & M System. 2011. http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable/files/2010/10/E-276_artichokes.pdf 
  2. Spaghetti, Cooked, Unenriched, Without Added Salt. USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/list 
  3. Fiber, Total Dietary Content (g) of Selected Foods Per Common Measure, Sorted by Nutrient Content. USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Release 25 http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12354500/Data/SR25/nutrlist/sr25w291.pdf 
  4. How is Atherosclerosis Treated? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. 2011 http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/atherosclerosis/treatment.html
  5. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 7th edition, Washington DC: US Govt. Printing Office, December 2010.  
  6. Position Statement of the American Dietetic Association: Health Implications of Dietary Fiber. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 2008, vol. 108, pp. 1716-31.

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