7 Ways to Get the Most Out of Your OAB Medication

Talking With Your Doctor About Your OAB Medicine

If you need medication for overactive bladder, also called OAB, it’s important you and your doctor have a discussion about your treatment goals, as well as cost and potential side effects, before you start. Setting realistic expectations is key; a large number of patients who begin treatment for OAB stop taking it within six months because they are disappointed with their results. But OAB medication can be beneficial—there are a number of things you should consider to get the most out of your medication.



THIS CONTENT DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. This content is provided for informational purposes and reflects the opinions of the author. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare professional regarding your health. If you think you may have a medical emergency, contact your doctor immediately or call 911.


Pat Bass III, MD

Dr. Pat Bass is chief medical information officer and an associate professor of medicine and pediatrics at LSU Health- Shreveport and University Hospital. View his Healthgrades profile >

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